lexunrank

lexunrank gives the the $k$-combination of $n$ elements of position $N$ in the lexicographic order of all combinations

Syntax

  • kcomb=lexunrank(n,k,N)example
  • kcomb=lexunrank(n,k,N,pascalM)example
  • [kcomb,calls]=lexunrank(___)example

Description

example

kcomb =lexunrank(n, k, N) 7th 2 combination chosen among 5 element.

example

kcomb =lexunrank(n, k, N, pascalM) number of binomial coefficient calls necessary to compute the 7th 2 combination chosen among 5 element.

example

[kcomb, calls] =lexunrank(___) 7th 2 combination chosen among 5 element, using the pascal matrix.

Examples

expand all

  • 7th 2 combination chosen among 5 element.
  • n = 5; 
    k = 2; 
    N = 7;
    kcomb=lexunrank(n,k,N)
    kcomb =
    
         4     1
    
    

  • 7th 2 combination chosen among 5 element, using the pascal matrix.
  • n = 5; 
    k = 2; 
    N = 7;
    [kcomb,calls]=lexunrank(n,k,N,pascal(n))
    kcomb =
    
         4     1
    
    
    calls =
    
         7
    
    

    Related Examples

    expand all

  • Additional example on the use of lexunrank.
  • Standard use.

    n = 4; p = 3;
    % number of p-combinations out of n
    n_bc = bc(n,p);
    % Pascal matrix
    pascalM=pascal(n);
    % n_bc is the Pascal cell in position (n-p+1,p+1)
    n_bc==pascalM(n-p+1,p+1)
    % all p-combinations in reverse-colex order generated by lexunrank
    % using a loop with rank integers ranging from 0 to bc(n,p)-1
    all_recolex = nan(n_bc,p);
    for N_lex = 0:n_bc-1
    all_recolex(N_lex+1,:) = lexunrank(n,p,N_lex);
    end
    all_recolex

  • Additional example on the use of lexunrank.
  • n = 4; p = 3;
    n_bc = bc(n,p);
    pascalM=pascal(n);
    n_bc==pascalM(n-p+1,p+1)
    all_recolex = nan(n_bc,p);
    for N_lex = 0:n_bc-1
    all_recolex(N_lex+1,:) = lexunrank(n,p,N_lex);
    end
    % To change from reverse-colex to colex.
    all_colex = flipud(all_recolex)
    % and to change from colex to lex, it is sufficient this
    all_lex = fliplr(all_colex)
    % all p-combinations in lexi order generated using combsFS
    all_lex_combs = combsFS(1:n,p)
    % the combination at Lexi position N_lex=3 is generated by lexiunrank
    % in Colex position
    N_lex = 3; N_colex = n_bc - N_lex ;

  • Additional example on the use of lexunrank.
  • n = 4; p = 3;
    n_bc = bc(n,p);
    pascalM=pascal(n);
    n_bc==pascalM(n-p+1,p+1);
    all_recolex = nan(n_bc,p);
    for N_lex = 0:n_bc-1
    all_recolex(N_lex+1,:) = lexunrank(n,p,N_lex);
    end  
    N_colex = n_bc - N_lex ;   
    % Use of lexunrank with pascal matrix
    kcomb = lexunrank(n,p,N_colex,pascal(n))
    % This is without Pascal matrix
    kcomb2 = lexunrank(n,p,N_colex)
    % Just as confirmation, the combination in the lexi order is
    all_lex_combs = combsFS(1:n,p)
    all_lex_combs(N_lex,:)

    Input Arguments

    expand all

    n — Number of elements. A non negative integer > k.

    Data Types: single|double

    k — Items to choose from the set of n elements. A non negative integer.

    Data Types: single|double

    N — Position N in the reverse co-lexicographic order of such combinations. A non negative integer between 0 and bc(n,p)-1.

    Data Types: single|double

    Optional Arguments

    pascalM — Pascal matrix. Matrix.

    The Pascal matrix as given by the MATLAB function pascal(n).

    In applications where lexunrank is called many times, it is preferable to compute the Pascal matrix once outside lexunrank, and pass it to lexunrank as optional argument. Otherwise, the required binomial coeffients are computed inside lexunrank using function bc and, when possible, using the traditional recurrent formula.

    Example: pascal(n)

    Data Types: single|double

    Output Arguments

    expand all

    kcomb —The $k$-combination of n elements at position N. Vector of length k

    The position is relative to a reverse co-lexicographic order of the combinations or, equivalently, of position bc(n,k)-N in the lexicographic order of the same combinations. Data Types - single|double

    calls —Binomial coefficients. Scalar

    The number of binomial coefficients used to compute the $k$-combination.

    Data Types - single|double

    More About

    expand all

    Additional Details

    REMARKS ON THE INPUT ARGUMENTS.

    Input checks are intentionally avoided, as lexunrank is supposed to be called many times, for sampling subsets. Thus, please ensure that:

    - k < n;

    - N is an integer between 0 and bc(n,p)-1.

    It is possible to enable checks, by changing an internal "if" statement to 1.

    REMARKS ON THE OUTPUT ARGUMENTS.

    As $n$ increases, 'calls' becomes much smaller than 'ncomb'. This means that lexunrank(n,k,N) is extremely convenient if you are interested in one or several, but not all, $k$-combinations at given generation order(s) N.

    To generate all combinations in lexicographic order, it is more convenient using the FSDA function combsFS. The MATLAB function with the same purpose, nchoosek(1:4,3), is much less efficient.

    ON THE LEXICOGRAPHIC ORDERING.

    lexunrank(n,k,N) gives the $k$-combination of n elements of position N in the reverse co-lexicographic order of such combinations or, equivalently, of position bc(n,k)-N in the lexicographic order of the same combinations.

    Note that, in this implementation of the lexicographic unrank, N ranges over the integers between 0 and bc(n,k)-1. For details see the "combinatorial number system" discussed by Knuth (2005), pp. 5-6.

    To clarify with an example the meaning of the different orders, while the lexicographic order of the 2-combinations of 3 elements are:

    \[ \left( \begin{array}{ccc} 1 & 2 & 3 \\ 1 & 2 & 4 \\ 1 & 3 & 4 \\ 2 & 3 & 4 \end{array} \right) \] the co-lexicographic order of the same combinations are \[ \left( \begin{array}{ccc} 3 & 2 & 1 \\ 4 & 2 & 1 \\ 4 & 3 & 1 \\ 4 & 3 & 2 \end{array} \right) \]

    and the reverse co-lexicographic order of the original combinations are:

    \[ \left( \begin{array}{ccc} 4 & 3 & 2 \\ 4 & 3 & 1 \\ 4 & 2 & 1 \\ 3 & 2 & 1 \end{array} \right) \]

    The reasons for choosing a co-lexicographic unrank is that right-to-left array filling is much faster and elegant. The reverse is due to a similar motivation.

    ALGORITMIC DETAILS.

    Given the totally ordered set $S=\{1,2,\ldots,n\}$, a $k$-combination is a subset $\{x_1, \ldots, x_k\}$ of $S$. Consider the $n$-lists of elements of the set $\{0,1\}$, i.e. the vertices of the hypercube $V_n$.

    Each $k$-combination $\{x_1,\ldots,x_k\}$ can be associated to the $n$-list having a 1 at position $x_1$, \ldots, $x_k$, and a 0 elsewhere.

    Example:

    2-combinations of $\{1,2,3,4\}$: $\{1,2\}$, $\{1,3\}$, $\{1,4\}$, $\{2,3\}$, $\{2,4\}$, $\{3,4\}$. Corresponding 4-lists of $\{0,1\}$:

    $1100$, $1010$, $1001$, $0110$, $0101$, $0011$.

    The $n$-lists of $\{0,1\}$ containing $k$ times 1, and therefore equivalently the $k$-combinations of $n$-elements of $S$, can be generated in lexicographic order with an algorithm that builds the $k$-list of position $t+1$ using only the $k$-list of position $t$, and which stops without counting the combinations generated. For example, the MATLAB function NCHOOSEK(S,k), where $S$ is the row vector of length $n$ of the elements of $S$, creates in lexicographic order a $k$ columns matrix whose rows consist of all possible combinations of the $n$ elements of $S$ taken $k$ at a time. The number of such combinations, given by the binomial coefficient $n!/((n-k)! k!)$, can be also computed with the function NCHOOSEK by replacing the first argument, the row vector $S$, with the scalar $n$.

    Unfortunately the binomial coefficient increases rapidly with $n$, which makes the generation of all $k$-combinations computationally hard: with NCHOOSEK the task is impractical even for values just above 15. However, a lexicographic algorithm implements a one-to-one correspondence between the $k$-combinations and the generation order, i.e. the set of numbers $s = 1,\ldots,(n!/((n-k)!k!))$. This fact is used in our function to determine the $n$-list corresponding to the $k$-combination $\{x_1, \ldots, x_k\}$ which would be generated by the lexicographic algorithm at a given desired position $N$. This is useful in a number of applications which require one or several, but not all, $k$-combinations at given generation order(s).

    References

    Lehmer, D. H. (1964). The machine tools of combinatorics. In E. F.

    Beckenbach (Ed.), "Applied Combinatorial Mathematics", pp. 5-31. New York, Wiley.

    Knuth, D. (2005). Generating All Combinations and Partitions. The Art of Computer Programming, Vol. 4, Fascicle 3. Reading, Mass., Addison-Wesley.

    See Also

    | |

    This page has been automatically generated by our routine publishFS